Romans 15

Today we’re reading Romans 15.

This chapter began by wrapping up the teaching we read yesterday on Christian liberty. The Bible does not address every choice that believers make in life so we have to apply biblical principles, godly wisdom, and personal preferences when making those choices. If your choice does not lead another person to sin, does not violate your own conscience, and you are comfortable about this choice when facing the Lord at the judgement seat of Christ, you have the freedom to choose.

I mentioned in the previous paragraph that we have to apply “biblical principles” in these situations. The opening paragraph of today’s reading emphasized that principle which is, “not to please ourselves... [rather] each of us should please our neighbors for their good, to build them up” (vv. 1b-2a). When we read 1 and 2 Corinthians, Paul mentioned more than once that this was his guiding principle for how he ate and for not taking money from the people of a city when he was starting a new church there. Here in Romans 15, Paul points us to the example of Christ in verses 3-13. Because Christ did not put himself first, the insults of sinners fell on him (v. 3) so that the Jews might receive God’s promises to them (v. 8) and the Gentiles might glorify God as well (vv. 9-13). This reminds us of the importance of considering others when we make choices that we don’t believe to be sinful but others might. We should accept other believers without casting doubt on the sincerity of their faith (v. 8) and we should make choices that won’t cause division in the body of Christ.

In verses 14-32 Paul expressed his confidence in the believers at Rome and described his plans to come visit them in the future. He asked them to “join me in my struggle by praying to God for me” (v. 30) because he was confident about their faith and maturity in Christ (v. 14). Despite his confidence in them spiritually, he conceded that he had “written you quite boldly on some points to remind you of them again.” This reminds us that strong Christians need to hear direct, even confrontational application of God’s word to our lives. No matter how much we grow in grace, we will still have points of ignorance, personal blindspots, and areas where obedience is a struggle. Our faith in Christ should give us the humility to receive correction in these areas and to use them to help us grow stronger for the glory of God.

Have you received some uncomfortably direct teaching recently, maybe in the form of a message or in a personal conversation from another believer? Our tendency in those moments is self-defense and maybe that was your initial reaction. On further reflection, however, if you see the wisdom and truth of the words that were spoken to you, have the humility to receive them and put them into practice in your life.